March 31, 2014

53

Create Different Headers in Word

by Elizabeth on March 31, 2014

by Elizabeth Kricfalusi, Tech for Luddites

This post was originally published in February 2009. It has been updated to clarify the steps for Word 2007 and 2010.

When I first wrote this blog post, Word 2003 was still the predominant version of the program, more commonly used than Word 2007. (And Word 2010 was just a gleam in some Microsoft programmer's eye...) So I basically wrote the post for users of 2003 and then just posted a brief explanation where to find the same functions in 2007, which was the first version to use ribbons instead of dropdown menus. Over the years, this has been one of the most popular T4L posts but now that 2007 and 2010 are more widely used, I've decided to spell out the steps for those versions in full. You can still find the instructions for Word 2003 and earlier versions later in the post.

Both sets of instructions are for creating different sections in an MS-Word document so you can change the header for each section. For example, you might want to have different headers with each chapter name to help readers find the section they're looking for more quickly.

Note: The same techniques work for creating separate footers, which you might want to do to start Page 1 after a Table of Contents, for example.

To illustrate the process, I've created a Word file from an earlier post: The INs of LinkedIn. You can download this file if you want to follow along with the steps yourself.

The document has three main topics in it: Invitations, Introductions, and InMails. Let's say I want to start each of these topics on a new page and create a different header with the topic name for each, with no header at all on the first page.

You may already know that you can force a page break by placing your cursor in front of the text you want to start on the next page and pressing Ctrl + Enter on your keyboard. (And if you don't know that, consider this a bonus tip!) :)

However, that won't work for our purpose. We don't want to just move the text to the next page; we want to start a new section so we can create a topic-specific header. We'll start by creating one for Invitations.

Instructions for Word 2007 and 2010

Put your cursor at the start of the Invitations heading.

On the Page Layout ribbon, click the down arrow beside the Breaks button.

Select Section Breaks > Next Page.

Now the Invitations heading is at the top of the next page.

Move your cursor near the top of the page and double-click to display the Header and Footer areas.

The Header and Footer Tools Design ribbon has opened at the top of the page. You can see that the Link to Previous button is depressed, meaning the two sections will have the same header. (You can also see a Same to Previous tab on the bottom border of the header section.)

Click the Link to Previous button.

The Same as Previous tab is now gone from the header section.

Type "Invitations" in the header area.

Double-click in the main text area of the page.

This will close the header section and remove the toolbar.

Note: I tabbed twice to have the text align to the right of the header.

Now, if you scroll back up to the first page, you can see that it has no header text, because the two headers are no longer linked.

Simply repeat these steps for each new section and you can have as many different headers as you want.

Instructions for Word 2003 and Earlier Versions

Put your cursor at the start of the Invitations heading.

From the Insert menu, select Break.

In the dialog box that comes up, select the "Next page" radio button from the "Section break types" area.

Now the Invitations heading is at the top of the next page. You can tell it's also the beginning of a new section by looking at the status line at the bottom left of the Word window.

From the View menu, click Header and Footer.

The header section of the page will be shown and the Header and Footer toolbar also appears.

You'll notice, above the header box, it says "Same as previous." This is the default option for when you create a header, and that's what we need to change.

Click the Same as Previous button on the toolbar.

You can mouse over the buttons to see the names of them. You want to click it so it doesn't look like it's depressed.

The "Same as previous" text is now gone from the header box.

Type "Invitations" in the header area.

Double-click in the main text area of the page.

This will close the header section and remove the toolbar.

Note: I tabbed twice to have the text align to the right of the header.

Now, if you scroll back up to the first page, you can see that it has no header text, because the two headers are no longer linked.

Simply repeat these steps for each new section and you can have as many different headers as you want.

Last Updated: April 1, 2014

 

Comments

{ 53 comments… read them below or add one }

Rema March 19, 2014 at 1:21 am

1. put the courser in section for which you want to different header or footer.
2. On the insert tab, click on the header or footer button in the header and footer group. From the menu, choose the edit header or footer option.
3. On the header & footer contextual tab, click on the Link to Previous button in the Navigation group.
4. You have new broken the link between.

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harpurharper January 14, 2014 at 7:22 am

thank you so much! Had struggled with what I thought was logic (and got part way there) but this was so simple and so quick.

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Alan July 3, 2013 at 8:47 am

If you have multiple sections, and you have selected “Different first page” headers in the Page Set Up dialog, and you link headers to previous sections, your first page in any new section will not link to the immediately preceding header, but back to the first page of the section, so you may need to deselect “Different first page” in subsequent sections.

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Michelle June 11, 2013 at 11:37 am

Thanks! This helped me out a lot – and I am using Word 2007.

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Elizabeth June 13, 2013 at 8:30 pm

So glad it helped, Michelle. Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment!

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Gina June 4, 2013 at 6:48 pm

I have a document with 108 pages and I need to start page numbering after my introduction (lets say page 14). How do I do that, I have been trying since yesterday but no success. Can someone help? Thanks

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Elizabeth June 5, 2013 at 11:54 pm

Hi Gina.

The basic principle is that you need to create two different sections, the first one for the introduction and the second one for the rest of the document. Then you need to unlink the header or footer for the sections (remove the Same as Previous link), depending on where you want to print the page number. Then add a page number to where you want it and using the Page Number Format menu, you can set the numbering to start at 1.

I hope that helps.

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Sharon June 4, 2013 at 12:35 pm

OMGsh!!! Thank you so much! We were so frustrated in trying to change/edit headers for another staff member! We thought we had tried everything! the ‘link to previous’ was it!!
SO appreciative!!

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Elizabeth June 4, 2013 at 6:07 pm

So glad you found it helpful! Thanks for letting me know.

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Ally April 14, 2013 at 10:46 pm

Just want to say thank you so much for years literally I could never figure out how to have a different header on the second page. You explained simply and clearly much appreciated. I have windows XP

Reply

Srisai March 5, 2013 at 9:59 am
Ivana Azdajic February 13, 2013 at 7:50 pm

What about when you need to use section break for page numbering aswell. Then it gets mixed up and my numbering ends up completely wrong.

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